Another Unanswered Question

My finger is healing nicely, which is good news. It’s just going to be another day or so before I can type normal again.

We took the new cat to the vet today and as expected, the new cat is a boy, not a girl. Carroll County Animal Control needs a few lessons on determining the sex of young cats. I thought it was boy, and had mentioned so several times since Christmas day.

This evening we picked up some groceries for dinner and while we were at it, we picked up a small bag of catnip for Mr. Kitty (aka Indy). He loves me again, at least for another week before he goes in for a little nip and tuck, so to speak.

I’ve been wondering about something most of the day, so here it is.

Was Eric Holder, or at the very least the law firm he worked for, responsible for the attempted terrorist attack on Christmas day?

At least one leader of al-Qa’ida’s branch in Yemen, where the failed bomber of a US-bound Christmas flight was allegedly trained, was freed from the US prison in Guantanamo, Cuba, a Pentagon list reveals.

The list, released in May, names 27 former prisoners who resumed terrorist activities after being released from Guantanamo, including Said Ali al-Shihri, who was transferred to Saudi Arabia in 2007 and later implicated in the bombing of the US embassy in Yemen’s capital, Sanaa, last year.

There is an additional and intriguing angle involving Yemen, creating a confluence between, that country, Ft. Hood and the Obama administration, in that U.S. AG Holder’s former law firm, Covington & Burling, represented a number of Yemeni detainees who are/were being held in GITMO.

Al Nashiri [born in Saudi Arabia] is part of a group of 15 Yemeni GITMO detainees who are represented by David Remes a member – until he was either booted or saw the handwriting on the wall and “resigned” on July 18, 2008 – of Attorney General Eric Holder’s law firm, Covington & Burling

Go read the entire thing and then make up your mind.

At the very least, the law firm should release pertinent documents so as to remove the appearance that they could any way be responsible for the actions which occurred on Christmas day.

Where has he (Eric Holder) been anyway? Not one word from him since the attempt to blow hundreds of Americans out of the sky? That’s just a little strange isn’t it?

What is it with the Obama administration and all the questions? It seems every time there is any sort of controversy, we’re always left with an unanswered question.

Name Dropping Gets You Nowhere

CannonIn my final post about the U.S. Department of Homeland Security “Rightwing Extremism” assessment, I made reference to something that was quoted in the report, and I want to make a few clarifications.

At the bottom of page five, the assessment reads,

Many rightwing extremist groups perceive recent gun control legislation as a threat to their right to bear arms and in response have increased weapons and ammunition stockpiling, as well as renewed participation in paramilitary training exercises. Such activity, combined with a heightened level of extremist paranoia, has the potential to facilitate criminal activity and violence.

  • During the 1990s, rightwing extremist hostility toward government was fueled by the implementation of restrictive gun laws—such as the Brady Law that established a 5-day waiting period prior to purchasing a handgun and the 1994 Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act that limited the sale of various types of assault rifles—and federal law enforcement’s handling of the confrontations at Waco, Texas and Ruby Ridge, Idaho.

In short, the government wants you to think that the threat of recent gun control legislation will push many “rightwing extremists” over the edge creating a heightened level of extremist paranoia, weapon stockpiling, and hostility toward the goverment. They go a step further in their attempt to instill fear by referencing the confrontations at Waco, Texas and Ruby Ridge, Idaho.

Many people remember the events that occurred at Waco but few people I have spoken too remember much about Ruby Ridge. Those who do remember it, usually can’t remember why they do, but they know something bad happened there.

Let’s take a look at the history of events which occurred at Ruby Ridge in August of 1992 and try to ascertain why our government would still be referencing the events there, 17 years after it happened.

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Twenty-Seven Potential Acts Of Violence

Blue GrosbeakWhen we think about the implications of Homeland Security, it’s important to remember that Americans are not the enemy.

As I wrap up my three-part series about the U.S. Department of Homeland Security “assessment” on Rightwing Extremism (PDF), I want to point out several more references included in the report, and touch on some thoughts about the release of this report.

Let’s refresh our memory.

The title of the assessment is “Rightwing Extremism: Current Economic and Political Climate Fueling Resurgence in Radicalization and Recruitment”. The targets of the assessment are radical and extremist groups as well as “groups and individuals that are dedicated to a single issue, such as opposition to abortion or immigration”, and the government believes some of our fine men and women of the military could be extremists, or even potential terrorists. All of these items are mentioned before the end of page 3. It’s a nine page report.

Page three wraps up by blaming the current economic crisis and the election of Barack Obama as the catalysts for creating more extremist thoughts in our country.

Page four makes it clear that most statements by rightwing extremists have been rhetorical since the election and have stopped short of violent action. The assessment warns us (vaguely) that there were two incidents before the election, but law enforcement interceded. Isn’t it funny they can point to specifics like the shooting in Pittsburgh on April 4th and the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing, but when it comes to supporting their “imposition of fear”, they can’t state any specifics?

Apparently, the government feels that the “perceived government infringement on civil liberties” leads to domestic rightwing terrorists lashing out. Of course they have to cite an increase in violent acts targeting government facilities, law enforcement officers, banks, and infrastructure sectors, yet, if you remember correctly in the paragraph above this one, they also stated that there has been no violent action.

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The Exception To The Rule

The men who have served as President of the United States worked hard to establish a legacy for themselves during their time in office. Whether they are remembered as one of our best presidents or one of the worst, I bet you can recall more information about their accomplishments and failures while they were serving in the Oval Office than anything they did after they left it.

We all remember what Franklin D. Roosevelt, John F. Kennedy, Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, and Bill Clinton did while they were in office, but can you recall what Lyndon B. Johnson did after leaving the White House? What about Herbert Hoover, Gerald Ford, or George H. W. Bush? The truth is, very few former presidents are remembered for their works after leaving the presidency.

The exception to that rule is Jimmy Carter.

It’s no secret that Jimmy Carter is not your average former U.S. President, that point should be obvious because he wasn’t your average U.S. President at the time he was elected either. While few people can recall anything he did while serving as president, he is dead set to make sure we all remember exactly what he did after leaving the White House, and I am not talking about his work with Habitat for Humanity.

Mr. Carter has gone out of his way to make sure the writers of history remember him as an ambassador to the entire world and a friend to terrorists everywhere.

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So Many Questions, So Little Time

In 11 days we will be choosing the next President of the United States. Well, we won’t be choosing him, the Electoral College will be choosing him, but they will do so based on our votes from state to state.

Doesn’t it seem like the candidates have been campaigning for four years or so? No, it couldn’t be that long, because four years ago, Barack Obama said he wasn’t qualified to serve as President. He said he was a firm believer that you need to know what you are doing when you apply for a job, and that he would have to start running for President right then and there before ever serving a day in the Senate. I think that’s exactly what he did, don’t you?

I have election fatigue. I am tired of it all. I am tired of turning on the television in the morning and hearing about the polls. I am tired of turning on the television or the radio, only to be inundated with ads. But most of all, I am tired of the political double-speak.

I am tired of hearing one thing and seeing another. I am tired of listening to Barack Obama say something about his plans, only to read those plans myself and learn they are completely different than he said they were in his speech.

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