Justice Department Approves Georgia Voter I.D. Law

Back in 2007, I wrote several posts about Georgia’s new Voter I.D. Law on my other blog, Slobokan’s Site O’ Schtuff.

Today, I am happy to say that the U.S. Department of Justice has approved the voter I.D. system.

The Justice Department has given Georgia approval to again verify voters’ identity and citizenship, Secretary of State Brian Kemp announced Monday.

Federal officials have pre-cleared a modified new program designed to confirm that prospective voters are U.S. citizens. The Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division had repeatedly rejected similar versions of the Georgia program.

It has been mired in legal challenges since 2008…

It’s about time. There is nothing wrong with requiring a voter to show proof of their identity and their citizenship, unless you’re a Democrat.

State Rep. Roger Bruce (D-Atlanta) said, “We should be doing things to encourage them to vote instead of making them jump through hoops”. What hoops? Carrying the same identification they are required to carry if they walk down the street, drive a car, or open an account at a bank? Hello? What hoops are Rep. Bruce referring to?

Oh wait. I remember. The only person jumping through hoops will be Roy Barnes, former Governor (and current candidate for Governor) who was spearheading an effort to overturn the law…

Former Democratic Gov. Roy Barnes had sought the action in a state court, arguing Thursday before Judge Melvin K. Westmoreland that requiring voters to show government-issued photo ID violated the state Constitution.

That’s right. Good ol’ boy Roy, who is the Democratic nominee for Governor was really looking forward to all of those votes from people who thought carrying a photo i.d. would take too much effort or would require them to act like every other member of society.

I think we should light those hoops on fire and watch King Roy sweat a little bit.

If you want to read all my previous posts about the Georgia Voter I.D. Law, here are the links to those posts.

Georgia Voter I.D. Law Upheld
Georgia Voter I.D. Law Not Unconstitutional
State Supreme Court Hears Voter ID Case
The Georgia Voter Yo-Yo Act
Georgia Supreme Court Rejects States Appeal
Georgia Voter ID Law On Hold… Again…
Georgia Voter I.D. Cards Aren’t Quite Ready
Justice Dept. Approves Georgia Voter I.D. Law
Governor Signs Georgia Voter I.D. Law… Again.
Georgia State Senate Debates Voter ID Law. Again.
U.S. Court Denies Appeal On Voter I.D.
Boortz On Yesterday’s Voter I.D. Decision
Georgia Voter I.D. Law On Hold
Got I.D.? No Problem
Nothing More Than A Poll Tax?
The NY Times Is Full Of It
The Georgia Voter ID Bus

People In Glass Houses…

By now you are familiar with Arizona’s SB 1070, right? Oh come on, I’m sure you’ve read it. The media won’t stop talking about it or the boycotts that have been announced because of it. SB 1070 is the new immigration law that everyone under the sun is squawking about. Schools won’t allow games to be played and cities won’t allow business to be done with the state of Arizona because of it.

Just in case you forgot what the law states, let me refresh you…

(a) Every law enforcement agency in Arizona shall fully cooperate with the United States Immigration and Naturalization Service regarding any person who is arrested if he or she is suspected of being present in the United States in violation of federal immigration laws.

(b) With respect to any such person who is arrested, and suspected of being present in the United States in violation of federal immigration laws, every law enforcement agency shall do the following:

(1) Attempt to verify the legal status of such person as a citizen of the United States, an alien lawfully admitted as a permanent resident, an alien lawfully admitted for a temporary period of time or as an alien who is present in the United States in violation of immigration laws. The verification process may include, but shall not be limited to, questioning the person regarding his or her date and place of birth, and entry into the United States, and demanding documentation to indicate his or her legal status.

(2) Notify the person of his or her apparent status as an alien who is present in the United States in violation of federal immigration laws and inform him or her that, apart from any criminal justice proceedings, he or she must either obtain legal status or leave the United States.

(3) Notify the Attorney General of Arizona and the United States Immigration and Naturalization Service of the apparent illegal status and provide any additional information that may be requested by any other public entity.

(c) Any legislative, administrative, or other action by a city, county, or other legally authorized local governmental entity with jurisdictional boundaries, or by a law enforcement agency, to prevent or limit the cooperation required by subdivision (a) is expressly prohibited.

Does that ring a bell? It should, especially if you live in California. You see, the section of code quoted above actually comes from the California State Penal Code, section 834b. I replaced ‘California’ with ‘Arizona’, but other than that slight modification it is the actual law, word for word, which has been on the books in California for quite some time.

With a law like this on the books, which is so very similar to the new law in Arizona, could someone please explain to me why the city of Los Angeles is boycotting the state of Arizona?

Stop, Look, And Show Me Your I.D.

Now that you’ve had time to digest everything the media is telling you about the new Arizona Immigration Law, and you’ve had time to read it (you did read the link I posted here on my site didn’t you?), Let’s look at the meat of the bill.

NO OFFICIAL OR AGENCY OF THIS STATE OR A COUNTY, CITY, TOWN OR OTHER POLITICAL SUBDIVISION OF THIS STATE MAY ADOPT A POLICY THAT LIMITS OR RESTRICTS THE ENFORCEMENT OF FEDERAL IMMIGRATION LAWS TO LESS THAN THE FULL EXTENT PERMITTED BY FEDERAL LAW

FOR ANY LAWFUL CONTACT MADE BY A LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICIAL OR AGENCY OF THIS STATE OR A COUNTY, CITY, TOWN OR OTHER POLITICAL SUBDIVISION OF THIS STATE WHERE REASONABLE SUSPICION EXISTS THAT THE PERSON IS AN ALIEN WHO IS UNLAWFULLY PRESENT IN THE UNITED STATES, A REASONABLE ATTEMPT SHALL BE MADE, WHEN PRACTICABLE, TO DETERMINE THE IMMIGRATION STATUS OF THE PERSON. THE PERSON’S IMMIGRATION STATUS SHALL BE VERIFIED WITH THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT PURSUANT TO 8 UNITED STATES CODE SECTION 1373(c).

Take a moment to read that part one more time. I’ll wait.

Arizona is simply enforcing federal immigration laws at the state level. Federal immigration laws that the feds are not (and have not been) enforcing.

The federal government changed the law in respect to state issued identification a few years ago.

By now people should have noticed that their renewal of their license in 2005 or later required much more documentation than was required prior. The reason for that is because the Federal Government set a series of guidelines that must be met for the issuance of IDs in order for the federal government to accept them.

Since all but one state is in compliance with these federal guidelines that is why a valid license from all states except one is proof someone is here legally.

In every state, but one, when you produce your state issued identification you are essentially proving your citizenship status at the same time.

As a white male in America I have been subjected to this very thing my entire life.

When I wanted to drive a car, I was told I needed proof of who I was in order to obtain a driver’s license. When I applied for grants and student loans, I was told I needed proof of my identity in order to receive either one of them. When I write a check, purchase alcohol, or use my credit card, I am constantly asked for identification. But most importantly, when I travel to Mexico, crossing at a legal border crossing, I am asked for my identification when I return. I am forced to prove my identity when I enter my own country.

I have lived my life pulling out documentation and providing proof of my identity. Why should it be different for anyone else? Many states already have laws on their books requiring you to carry (and produce when asked) photo identification, so how is this law any different?

Many people consider this bill to be racial profiling, but let’s be honest here. It’s not like we have hundreds or thousands of Irish people crossing our southern border on a daily basis. It’s only natural that some people consider this new law racist since, coincidentally, a large number of those here illegally are of the same race.

The new Arizona immigration law isn’t really new (or news) at all. The 17 page bill simply gives authorities the right to double check someone’s citizenship status while engaging them for other reasons (traffic violations, investigation of crimes).

If I am not mistaken, I am also asked for my identification if I am pulled over for a traffic violation or suspected of committing a crime.

Obviously, our country was founded by immigrants, but illegal immigration shouldn’t be tolerated. If we’re willing to ignore one crime, how long will it take until we begin to ignore all of them?

— Posted with Stuffr! —

Misreported Law Subject To Much Scrutiny

This week I participated in a poll from Right Wing News for conservative bloggers on the Arizona immigration law, illegals, & legal immigration.

The new Arizona law is probably one of the most, if not the most mis-reported laws I have ever read about. There are so many falsehoods being reported about this law that it makes me laugh. For years, people have complained about the mainstream media and the total lack of facts in many of their reports, yet now many of those same people are using the mainstream media as their source as they lambast this new law.

I highly recommend reading the entire Arizona Immigration Law which you can find at the Arizona State Legislature website. If you would rather download the PDF version or print it out, you can also download the Arizona Immigration Law in that format.

The poll, conducted by John Hawkins at Right Wing News, contained several questions ranging from “Do you approve of Arizona’s new immigration law?” and “Would you like to see your state implement something like Arizona’s new immigration law?” to “Do you believe the fence on our southern border will be completed while Barack Obama is in office?” and “Do you believe Arizona’s new immigration law constitutes racial profiling or discriminates against Hispanic Americans?”

You can find out the results of the poll over at Right Wing News.

The Dangers Of Bench Legislation

One of my biggest pet peeves is when judges attempt to legislate from the bench. Our system of government is set up with checks and balances for a reason, and some people feel that their “cause” is more important than following the normal course of events as our founding fathers defined them.

With this in mind, it comes as no surprise that some organizations are trying to persuade the Supreme Court to apply the United Nations’ Convention on the Rights of the Child as a matter of binding ‘customary international law’, even though the United States has not ratified the CRC.

Amnesty International believes that international law, rather than American law, should be used to make this decision. We have been warning people for some time that this theory could be used to force this treaty upon an unwilling American public. Americans want to retain family-based decision-making and American-made law. The UN Convention Rights of the Child would undermine both of these principles,” constitutional lawyer Michael Farris said.

If the Supreme Court rules that the international laws defined in the CRC are binding on the American people, a vast majority of family laws from virtually every state could be impacted and no longer applicable.

No international law should supersede an American law within the borders of our sovereign nation and our nation’s laws should originate in an American legislative body not from the hammering of a gavel from the bench.

You can read about these cases which could have a long-lasting impact on families across America, at parentalrights.org.