Pearl Harbor: Sixty-Nine Years Ago

At dawn on December 7, 1941, Japanese planes attacked the United States Pacific Fleet at Pearl Harbor In Hawaii.

Anxious to maintain their military and economic power in the region the Japanese planned to cripple the U.S. fleet which would then allow them to attack the Philippines and Indo-China without opposition and acquire the raw materials they needed to maintain their position.

Several ships were sunk or damaged, the U.S.S. Oklahoma capsized, and the U.S.S. Arizona was completely destroyed. More than 2,300 Americans died in the attack.

The next day President Franklin D. Roosevelt addressed a joint session of Congress, which declared war against Japan, and the United States officially entered World War II. The Japanese had no idea they were awakening a sleeping giant. December 7th, 1941 truly was a date which would live in infamy.

James Bradley, whose father was one of those who raised the flag on Iwo Jima, has studied the war and the reason Japan attacked us in the first place.

In a secret presidential cable to Tokyo, in July 1905, Roosevelt approved the Japanese annexation of Korea and agreed to an “understanding or alliance” among Japan, the United States and Britain “as if the United States were under treaty obligations.” The “as if” was key: Congress was much less interested in North Asia than Roosevelt was, so he came to his agreement with Japan in secret, an unconstitutional act.

Bradley’s op-ed in the New York Times is an excellent read for anyone who wants to know the real reason that Japan decided to attack us the way they did.

Take a moment today to remember all of those who died on that December morning in 1941.

Continue reading

Reflections Of Honor: Veterans Day 2010

This year, like every year before, we should be grateful for our nation’s veterans. Here is my post from last year, which pays tribute the veterans in my family. Take a moment today to honor the veterans in your family, as well as all of the brave men and women who have shaped our great nation.

unknownsoldier.jpgIn 1918, on the 11th day of the 11th month at the eleventh hour, the Allies and Germany signed the armistice that brought an end to the hostilities on the Western Front and marked the end of fighting in World War I. The war officially ended on June 28, 1919 with the signing of the Treaty of Versailles.

In 1919, President Woodrow Wilson proclaimed the first Armistice Day to remember those who were killed during the war. People around the world took time out of their day, each November 11th, to recognize those members of their armed forces who died during the war. In 1938, Armistice Day was made an official U.S. holiday as “a day to be dedicated to the cause of world peace and to be thereafter celebrated and known as ‘Armistice Day’.” Years later, new legislation changed the name to Veterans Day and it became a day to remember all of the men and women who have served our nation in the Armed Forces, not just those who died.

Veterans Day is a day to thank and honor all of the men and women who have served in our nation’s military, during peacetime and war. It is a day to acknowledge that their contributions to our nation are appreciated and the sacrifices they made to serve their country did not go unnoticed.

Every Veterans Day I think about the men and women in my own family who served our nation proudly.

Continue reading

The Battle Of Lepanto

Today is the 439th anniversary of the Battle of Lepanto. Many of you probably have no idea what it was, or why it matters in world history, I didn’t either, until recently.

The Battle of Lepanto took place on 7 October 1571 when a fleet of the Holy League, a coalition of Spain (including its territories of Naples, Sicily and Sardinia), the Republic of Venice, the Papacy, the Republic of Genoa, the Duchy of Savoy, the Knights Hospitaller and others, decisively defeated the main fleet of the Ottoman Empire.

Had it not been for the outcome of the Battle of Lepanto, the course of events throughout the world could have been much different. It is very likely that there would have been no ‘established’ Church, and we would all be kneeling down on prayer rugs facing east every afternoon.

The Holy League credited the victory to the Virgin Mary, whose intercession with God they had implored for victory through the use of the Rosary. Andrea Doria had kept a copy of the miraculous image of our Our Lady of Guadalupe given to him by King Philip II of Spain in his ship’s state room. Pope Pius V instituted a new Catholic feast day of Our Lady of Victory to commemorate the battle, which is now celebrated by the Catholic Church as the feast of Our Lady of the Rosary.

Take a moment today to read the history of the Battle of Lepanto, you might just learn something you didn’t know beforehand.

— Posted with Stuffr! —

It Gets Wilder By The Minute

Did you know, if you order a copy of the U.S. Constitution or the Declaration of Independence from Wilder Publications (no I am not linking to them), you’ll see the following at the end of their reprints.

“This book is a product of its time and does not reflect the same values as it would if it were written today. Parents might wish to discuss with their children how views on race, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, and interpersonal relations have changed since this book was written before allowing them to read this class work.”

All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America. No part of this book may be used or reproduced in any manner without written permission except brief quotations for review purposes only.

A&D Publishing
PO Box 3005
Radford, VA 24143-3005
www.wilderpublications.com

Since when do we need a warning label on the U.S Constitution?

It is obvious that the publishers, who also seem to be claiming copyright to the document, feel that the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence are outdated and do not the reflect the same values today as they did back in the day.

Really?

Many Americans (including myself) believe the values within the U.S. Constitution are the same today as they were when the document was written. Those who think otherwise never held those values in the first place.

Why on Earth would I purchase a product from a company that doesn’t believe in our founding principles and feels the need to add a disclaimer to our founding documents?

Thanks, but no thanks. Oh, and I’ll use, reprint, and reproduce the U.S. Constitution, the Declaration of Independence, the Federalist Papers, and any other founding document, whenever I want, with or without your permission. The executives at Wilder Publications are crazy if they think they own the copyright to any of our founding documents.

Pearl Harbor, Sixty Eight Years Ago

At dawn on December 7, 1941, Japanese planes attacked the United States Pacific Fleet at Pearl Harbor In Hawaii.

Anxious to maintain their military and economic power in the region the Japanese planned to cripple the U.S. fleet which would then allow them to attack the Philippines and Indo-China without opposition and acquire the raw materials they needed to maintain their position.

Several ships were sunk or damaged, the U.S.S. Oklahoma capsized, and the U.S.S. Arizona was completely destroyed. More than 2,300 Americans died in the attack.

The next day President Franklin D. Roosevelt addressed a joint session of Congress, which declared war against Japan, and the United States officially entered World War II. The Japanese had no idea they were awakening a sleeping giant. December 7th, 1941 truly was a date which would live in infamy.

James Bradley, whose father was one of those who raised the flag on Iwo Jima, has studied the war and the reason Japan attacked us in the first place.

In a secret presidential cable to Tokyo, in July 1905, Roosevelt approved the Japanese annexation of Korea and agreed to an “understanding or alliance” among Japan, the United States and Britain “as if the United States were under treaty obligations.” The “as if” was key: Congress was much less interested in North Asia than Roosevelt was, so he came to his agreement with Japan in secret, an unconstitutional act.

Bradley’s op-ed in the New York Times is an excellent read for anyone who wants to know the real reason that Japan decided to attack us the way they did.

Take a moment today to remember all of those who died on that December morning in 1941.

Continue reading