Numbers, Numbing, & Numbnuts

Today was supposed to be a fun day. We were planning on attending a camera club field trip, but all three boys were up late into the night excited about the pending snowfall. The snow began to fall around 2am, lightly. Very lightly. Tiny, almost microscopic snow flurries were drifting down onto our deck.

We woke in the morning, to no snow. None. Nada. Zilch. So there we were with three boys who all had less than 5 hours sleep. The heck if I was going to try to take them anywhere.

We’re waiting now for the annual Christmas parade in our small town. The boys love seeing all the different police cars and fire trucks, as well as all of the floats from the different civic and church organizations. I’m planning to take video of the entire parade, which usually lasts about 10 minutes or so.

Here are some thoughts to get you through until tomorrow, when you’ll be able to see my awesome small town Christmas parade video.

Thought #1

The numbers just don’t add up.

President Obama told us that unemployment would peak at 7.9% if the stimulus was passed. The stimulus passed and now unemployment is sitting at 10%.

More than 2.3 million people have stopped looking for work because of the economy, because more than 2.6 million jobs have been lost since the stimulus was passed.

Want to see more numbers? Check it out.

Thought #2

The Obama administration is sticking their heads in the sand again.

The U.N.’s decision this week to investigate whether some of its climate change research had been manipulated constitutes a “direct rebuke” of the Obama administration, Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Calif.) said Friday.

The White House’s unwillingness to open a similar inquiry could now only be characterized as “a sad abdication of their responsibility to ensure that U.S. policies are not driven by corrupted science and data,” the congressman added.

We have evidence that climate data has been tampered with. Raw data has been destroyed, so we have no evidence that man-made global warming even exists. Wouldn’t it be prudent to investigate the events that led up to the deception and the fraud, to find out (a) who is responsible and why, (b) if man is actually having any effect on the Earth’s climate, and (c) what we can do in the future so a handful of over-zealous scientists don’t control all of the raw data that is used to support their own falsified scientific theories?

Thought #3

Would Comcast stoop so low as to blatantly pander the President and Congress to win approval of the Comcast/NBC deal?

Now Comcast is a big company, with about 100,000 employees. I’m sure health care costs have a big impact on their bottom line. But the bottom line impact on Roberts’ personal net worth will be much greater if the federal government, with a big say-so from the US Senate, approves the $13 billion deal.

So Roberts’ heartfelt letter to the president in support of the Democrats’ singular policy issue was the first action he took in what is expected to be a twelve-month regulatory review process. This is an action with absolutely no relevance to the vast intricacies of the merger, but a move that sets a new standard for blatant pandering aimed at a group of people for whom pandering is the new coin of the realm.

Heck, I’ve seen politicians supporting the socialist agenda and American citizens actually supporting that agenda, I’ve seen the women Tiger Woods was with when he allegedly cheated on his wife, none of which are hotter than his wife, and I’ve seen family members show their true colors and take it out on my children, so nothing, and I mean nothing that happens now will ever really surprise me.

Thought #4

What is NASA hiding?

Chris Horner, a senior fellow at the Competitive Enterprise Institute, said NASA has refused for two years to provide information under the Freedom of Information Act that would show how the agency has shaped its climate data and would explain why the agency has repeatedly had to correct its data going as far back as the 1930s.

“I assume that what is there is highly damaging,” Mr. Horner said. “These guys are quite clearly bound and determined not to reveal their internal discussions about this.”

The numbers matter. Under pressure in 2007, NASA recalculated its data and found that 1934, not 1998, was the hottest year in its records for the contiguous 48 states. NASA later changed that data again, and now 1998 and 2006 are tied for first, with 1934 slightly cooler.

Something tells me, now that the Climategate scandal has broken, we’re going to see another recalculation or two.